Calibrating a 5″ Raspberry Pi touchscreen in Jessie

Previously, I posted about a 5″ touchscreen for the Raspberry Pi.

But I did not mention calibrating the touchscreen.

After a week’s holiday, I came back and sorted this fairly easily.

I was using Raspbian Jessie from NOOBS 1.8

First I installed a new utility:

sudo apt-get install xinput-calibrator

 Calibration

To calibrate the touchscreen, go to the menu>preferences>select “Calibrate touchscreen”

Touch each of the red crosses on the screen in turn, then cut and paste the resulting snippet to the following file by using this command:

sudo nano /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/98-calibration.conf

(this will create a new file and open it for editing)

My entries are below:

Section “InputClass”

Identifier “calibration”

MatchProduct “ADS7846 Touchscreen”

Option “Calibration” “120 3970 205 3920” #(enter your numbers here)

Option “SwapAxes” “0”

EndSection

Ctrl-O to save, Crtl-x to exit, and then reboot, and your pointer should follow your finger correctly!

MythTV and a TBS HDTV (DVB-T2) Card

HDTV cards with Linux support are fairly few and far between. Although TBS support Linux, you have to compile the driver yourself.

(and again every time you update your kernel).

I Use mine in a MythTV server, running Mythbuntu 14.04

Quad core AMD 5350 Kabini processor, Asus  AM1-A miniITX motherboard, 4GB RAM, and a TBS 6280 HDTV PCIe Dual DVB-T2 tuner card.

I found that to get smooth 1080p video on the device’s screen, , the proprietary AMD drivers were necessary.

MythTV works well, I am using Kodi (XBMC) on devices around the house for streaming.

Downloading and compiling TBS HDTV card drivers

First you need to add the tools: Zip, GCC and headers:

sudo apt-get install p7zip-full unzip build-essential linux-headers-generic-$(uname -r)

TBS driver downloads:
latest one:
http://www.tbsdtv.com/download/document/common/tbs-linux-drivers_v150525.zip
or paste this into a terminal:
wget http://www.tbsdtv.com/download/document/common/tbs-linux-drivers_v150525.zip

Some people have reported problems with the latest driver, here is where to get an earlier version:
http://www.tbsdtv.com/download…
or paste this into a terminal:
wget http://www.tbsdtv.com/download…

In terminal (assuming you are in your home directory, and you downloaded the TBS driver into Downloads)
mkdir tvdrivers
cd Downloads
for the latest version:
cp tbs-linux-drivers_v150525.zip /home/tvdrivers

cd /home/tvdrivers
unzip tbs-linux-drivers_v150525.zip
tar xjvf linux-tbs-drivers.tar.bz2
cd linux-tbs-drivers

for version 141019:
cp
tbs-linux-drivers_v141019.zip /home/tvdrivers

cd /home/tvdrivers
unzip tbs-linux-drivers_v141019.zip
tar xjvf linux-tbs-drivers.tar.bz2
cd linux-tbs-drivers

for both versions:
check for version (32bit or 64bit)
uname -a
for 32 bit:
sudo ./v4l/tbs-x86_r3.sh
for 64 bit:
sudo ./v4l/tbs-x86_64.sh
You should see “TBS drivers configured for (32bit or 64 bit) platform”
sudo make

go and make a cuppa
once complete :
sudo make install
and when complete, reboot.

v4l files are stored at:
/lib/modules/(your kernel version)/kernel/drivers/media
If you have problems, it may be worth clearing this directory before compiling.
You can find out your kernel version with the command:
uname -r
You can make sure you have the correct kernel headers with the command:
sudo apt-get install linux-headers-$(uname -r)

More info and links here:
http://linuxtv.org/wiki/index….

KDE4- the revelation

Well, after a long time as a KDE3 user, I was staring into the barrel of a warm gun.
Opensuse 11.2- KDE4.
I had to decide, move to KDE4, become (shudder) a Gnome user, or move to my best alternative- XFCE.
I had tried KDE4 in earlier incarnations, stability and usability issues stopped me experimenting further.
I finally bit the bullet and installed in a VM to test.
At first it was confusing, but once I threw away all convention and read the manual, it worked well.
After a short period of acclimatisation, it just works so well for me, I am astounded by the logicality of it all!
I have played with various GUIs, and this is a real revelation.
Not the half hearted redraw of Vista or win7, but a new, well thought out approach.

As for Opensuse, my dual monitors were identified and configured, along with my Wacom Bamboo tablet, I now have seperate Xserver settings for each login, and it just works smoothly, including interfacing to Exchange on the laptop.

Yes, it is still in development and there is the odd rough spot, but overall, a real advance in usability.
It now sits happily on my main desktop and my dual boot Work Laptop.

Bravo KDE team, and plaudits for the OpenSuse team too!